JAPANESE PRINTS

A MILLION QUESTIONS

TWO MILLION MYSTERIES

 

Ukiyo-e Prints

浮世絵版画

Port Townsend, Washington

 

UTAGAWA KUNISADA

川国貞
うたがわくにさだ
1786-1865

Title:

Tohachi go-mon jitsuwa naosuke gonbe Matsumoto Kōshirō kyu sue dokoro

Actor: Matsumoto Kōshirō V (1764-1838)
(五世)松本幸四郎
まつもとこうしろう
Role: Tohachi Go-mon (but actually Naosuke Gonbe)
Play: Tokaidō Yotsuya Kaidan
東海道 四谷怪談
とうかいどうよつやかいだん
Performance: Nakamura Theater from July 27, 1825
Date: 1825, 7th Month

Bunsei 8

文政8

Publisher: Kiyomizu (or Shimizu - 清水 or しみず)

Signed: Gototei Kunisada ga
署名: 五渡亭国貞画
しょめい: ごとてい.くにさだ.が
Print Size: 14" x 9 3/8"
Mat Size: 20" x 16"

 Illustrated:

Another copy of this print is shown on line at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts

web site. It is from the William Sturgis Bigelow Collection -
accession number 11.39354

 

$240.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kōshirō V was also known as "High Nose"

because of his most noticeable facial feature.

 

Below is a clearer image of the signature, publisher's seal and kiwame. (Kiwame means approved.)

 

 

 

 

MOXA TREATMENT?

灸治?

きゅうじ?

No wonder Emma-O, the king of the underworld, looks so unhappy.

He is about to suffer through moxibustion therapy.

 

 

MOXA

 

I don't know about you, but I am terribly frustrated when looking up a term and I get hit with more terms I have to look up. It isn't that I am stupid, but specialties have their own particular jargons --- their argots. For example, at a site called Dictionary.com they used the terms mogusa, escharotic, yomigi, Artemisia Chinensis, amadou and A. moxa when defining moxa. Of course, this may explain why I didn't get a perfect score on the vocabulary part of my high school S.A.T.  test. However, on the other hand it gives me an opportunity to start a few more research projects and I love that stuff. (By the way, I would do a lot better today than I did when I was 18. If only I knew then....sigh...and there had been an Internet...sigh!)

 

Mogusa: The American Heritage Dictionary tells us that this word comes from a combination of the verb moeru (to burn) plus kusa (an herb). Although they don't spell it out it turns out that mogusa, pronounced mogsa, was corrupted in translation to moxa.

Above is an detail from a print by Yoshitoshi in which a woman is undergoing moxa treatment.

 

To see another print featuring Matsumoto Kōshirō V click on the image below.

That example is by Kunisada's teacher Toyokuni I.

 

 

 

 

THE FINEST KABUKI SITE ON THE INTERNET!

 

http://www.kabuki21.com/

 

 

 

TO SEE A FULL BIOGRAPHY AND LINKS TO NUMEROUS PAGES WITH OTHER IMAGES OF

MATSUMOTO KŌSHIRŌ V

GO TO

 

MATSUMOTO KŌSHIRŌ V

 

 

 

 

 

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