JAPANESE PRINTS

A MILLION QUESTIONS

TWO MILLION MYSTERIES

 

 

Ukiyo-e Prints

浮世絵版画

Port Townsend, Washington

 

Kobayashi Kiyochika

小林清親

こばやしきよちか

1847-1915

 

Series:

Long Live Japan - 100 Victories, 100 Laughs

日本萬歳 - 百撰百笑

Title:

"Making Chinese Soldiers Shiver"

(Shinbei no hiyakasare)

Note: The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston says of this title:

"...this design utilizes a play on the meanings of hiyakasu, 'to chill' or 'to laugh at.' "

Publisher:

Although trimmed it is most probably

Matsuki Heikichi

Date: 1894-5

Condition:

Good color and backed.

Price: $120.00

Note: There is another copy of this print in the collection

of Waseda University, another one in the

Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery at Scripps College

and one at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

 

 

 

 

"During the war with China, as throughout most of his career, Kiyochika revealed two faces, one lyrical and one comic. The lyric impulse during this period was reserved for the triptych format, while the comic spirit found expression in a series of single-sheet color woodblocks entitled 'One Hundred Victories, One Hundred Laughs' (Hyakusen hyakushō). The publisher was Matsuki Heikichi, who was also responsible for the majority of Kiyochika's war triptychs.

 

The series appeared in two parts, with different prefixes to the main title. First came 'Long Live Japan: One Hundred Victories, One Hundred Laughs,' a total of fifty sheets that appeared from as early as October 1894 and on into the late spring of 1895. At this point a table of contents was issued listing the first fifty prints and announcing a change in the series title to 'Magic Lantern of Society: One Hundred Victories, One Hundred Laughs,' thus marking the end of the war. The series continued on into early 1896, although it is doubtful that the second set of fifty was ever completed."

 

Note: The title 'Hyakussen hyakushō' is a pun on the homonyms that can be read either as "One Hundred Selections, One Hundred Laughs" or as "One Hundred Battles, One Hundred Victories," a common phrase at that time.

 

 

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