JAPANESE PRINTS

A MILLION QUESTIONS

TWO MILLION MYSTERIES

 

Ukiyo-e Prints

浮世絵版画

Port Townsend, Washington

 

 

PUBLISHERS

T to Uoya Eikichi

 

To go to our other publishers pages click on the stamps below

A thru G

H thru Imariya Ushizō

Ise Mago thru J

K thru Manzen

Maruya thru Murataya

N thru S

 

Wakasaya to Z

 

 

 

CLICK ON THE IMAGES OF THE PRINTS SHOWN BELOW

TO SEE LARGER EXAMPLES.

 

 

PUBLISHER

KANJI

KANA

LOCATION

EXAMPLE

SEAL

ARTISTS

DATES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Takada-ya Takezō

( Seal name: Kintake

錦竹)

Marks #509

 

高田屋

竹蔵

たかだや

たけぞう

Edo

 

The print to the right is

from the Lyon Collection.

Click on it to go to its

full page.

 

 

Marks seal #07-038

Marks notes that this seal

was used between  the

1852-1853.

 

Kuniyoshi,

Toyokuni III,

Yoshiiku

Andreas Marks gives

the dates as ca. 1851-61

Hori Chōsen carved one of the blocks for this publisher's Kuniyoshi Tokaidō series in 1853. Not the one to the far right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Takahashi-ya Takakichi

( Firm name: Bun'eidō

文栄堂)

Marks #512

高橋屋

高吉

たかはしや

たかきち

Edo

 

The print to the right is

from the Lyon Collection.

Click on it to go to its

full page.

 

Marks seal #01-127

Marks notes that this seal

was used in 1844.

 

Kuniyoshi,

Yoshitsuya

Andreas Marks gives

the dates as ca. 1844-47

 

 

 

 

 

 

Takemura Hideo

Marks #524

竹村
秀雄

たけむらひでお

Yokohama

There is no link to this

Hodo print shown above.

 

Marks seal #26-155

Hodo & Kōitsu

Andreas Marks gives

the dates as ca. 1926-1939

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tama-ya Sōsuke

(Seal name:

Tamasō 玉惣)

Marks #528

玉屋

 惣助

たまや

そうすけ

Edo/Tokyo

 

Marks seal #25-145

Marks notes that this seal

was used in 1849. This

does not agree with the date

of the print to the left which

is from 1868.

Kuniyoshi, Toyokuni III,

Yoshifuji, Yoshiiku,

Yoshikazu, Yoshitoshi

Andreas Marks gives

the dates as ca. 1847-68

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tamura Tetsujirō

Marks #531

田村

鉄治郎

たむら

てつじろう

Tokyo

 

The image to the

right is from the Lyon Collection.

 

Click on the image

to see more information.

 

Marks seal #26-120

Chikashige,

Kunichika,

Andreas Marks gives

the dates as ca. 1876-78.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tenmaya Kihei

(Seal name: Tenki

天喜; firm name

Kinkadō 金華堂

Marks #536

天喜

or

天満屋

喜兵衛

てんき

or

てんまや

きへい

Osaka

 

 

Marks seal #26-155

Marks notes that this seal

was used between

1826-1838.

Ashiyuki, Hironobu,

Hirosada, Hokucho,

Hokuei, Hokusetsu,

Hokushū, Kiyokuni,

Kunhiro, Nobuharu,

Nobuhiro, Nobukatsu,

Nobumasa, Sadahiro,

Sadamasu, Sadanobu, 

Sadayoshi,  Shibakuni,

Shigeharu, Shigenao,

Toshikuni, Toyohide,

Umekuni & Yoshikuni

Andreas Marks gives

the dates as ca. 1816-60

 

 

 

 

The image to the

right is from the Lyon Collection.

 

Click on the image

to see more information.

 

 

 

 

Marks seal #24-035

Marks notes that this seal

was used in 1836.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correction on 12/23/15

Toshikuraya Shinbei

formerly referred to as Toshin

(aka Tokura-ya Shinbei)

Marks #539

(Seal name -

Rishin/Toshishin

利新)

利倉屋

新兵衛

 

としくらや

しんべえ

Osaka

 

One more point:

This  Hokushū print is often

shown without any publisher's

seal.

 

The image to the

right is from the Lyon Collection.

 

Click on the image

to see more information.

 

 

Marks seal #25-553

Marks notes that this seal

was used between

1821-1823.

Ashihiro, Ashikuni, Ashiyuki, Chikakuni, Hikokuni, Hokuchu, Hokusei, Hokushū, Kunihiro, Kuninao, Shibakuni, Shigeharu, Shigenobu, Shuncho, Shunshi, Tamikuni, Utakuni  & Yoshikuni

Andreas Marks gives

the dates as ca. 1815-38

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsujioka-ya Bunsuke

(Seal name -

Tsujibun 辻文;

firm name -

Kinshōdō 金松堂;

family name -

 

Tsujioka Bunsuke 辻岡文助)

3 variants shown

Marks #548

辻岡屋

文助

つじおかや
ぶんすけ

Edo

 

There is no internal link to this

Kuniyoshi print shown above.

 

However, if you want to see more information about this image click

on the print to see what  it says

about the print in the

Lyon Collection.

 

Marks seal #21-228

Eitaku, Fusatane,

Ginkō, Hirokage,

Hiroshige II, Hiroshige III,

Kuniaki II, Kunichika,

Kunihisa II, Kunisada II,

Kunisato, Kunitaka,

Kuniteru, Kuniteru II,

Kuniyasu,

Kuniyoshi, Kyōsai,

Nobukazu, Sadahide, Toshihide,

Toyokuni I,
Toyokuni III,

Yoshifuji, Yoshiharu,

Yoshiharu II,

Yoshiiku, Yoshikazu,

Yoshimitsu, Yoshimune,

Yoshitoshi, Yoshitoyo,

 Yoshitsuya

Andreas Marks gives the

dates of ca. 1814 to ca. 1896

The carver Hori Gin worked
for this publisher.

"Tsujiokaya Bunsuke published actor prints by Toyokuni beginning around 1814. His output decreased significantly during the late 1820s and early 1830s. In the late 1830s and early 1840s, he picked up again and became more active by issuing some minor series of Kuniyoshi and Kunisada respectively. But it was not until the late 1840s when Tsujiokaya's business finally boomed through issuing Kunisada's actor prints." In the fourth month of 1852 he took over the publishing firm of Tsuru-ya Kiemon. (See that listing below.) In the mid-1850s Tsujioka started publishing illustrated books and in time this became a more important factor than the production of prints. Source and quotes from Japanese Woodblock Prints: Artists, Publishers and Masterworks 1680-1900 by Andreas Marks, p. 262.

 

 

 

 

The print shown to the right is not one we have offered. However, it has a publisher's seal which we want to display for your information. The image  has been sent to us from the Eikei (英渓) Collection. We are grateful for this contribution to our site

This example comes from a different

 print than the one being shown.

 

Marks seal #23-066

 

 

 

The print to the right is

from the Lyon Collection.

Click on it to go to its

full page.

 

 

 

Marks seal #01-107

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsuji-ya Yasubei

(  Seal name -

Tsujibun 辻安;

firm name -

Kinkaidō 錦魁堂)

Marks #550

辻屋

安兵衛

 つじや

やすべい

Edo

 

The print shown to the right is not one we have offered. However, it has a publisher's seal which we want to display for your information.  The image was sent to us from our contributor ED.  We are grateful for this addition to our site.

 

Marks seal #25-418

Fusatane, Hiroshige,

Hiroshige II, Kunichka,

Kunihisa II, Kunimori,

Kunimori II,

as Kunisada & Toyokuni III,

Kuniyoshi, Hōrai Shunshō,

 Yoshitora, Yoshitsuna

Andreas Marks gives the

dates of ca. 1842 to 1/1863.

 

The carver Hori Shōji worked
for this publisher in 1858.

 

 

 

 

The print to the right is

the top half of a vertical

diptych. To see the whole thing,

click on it.

 

 

Unlisted in Marks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsunajima Kamekichi

Marks identifies this publisher as

Tsujiokaya Kamekichi - #549

綱島
亀吉

つなじま

かめきち

Tokyo

There is no link to this

Yoshitoshi print shown above.

Beisaku, Chikanobu,

Chikashige, Eitaku,

Fusatane, Ginkō,

Hiroshige III,

Kunichika,

Kunimatsu, Kunisada III,

Nobukazu, Seisai,

Shigekiyo, Toyokuni III,

 Toyonobu, Yoshiiku,

Yoshitora,  Yoshitoshi, Yoshitora, Yūsai Toshiaki

Andreas Marks gives the

dates of ca. 1857 to 1869.

 

 

 

    

 

The print shown to the right is from the Lyon Collection.

Click on it to see

the full page devoted to this print.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsunoi

Marks #552

(Marks refers to this publisher

as Tsunokuniya Isaburō)

津伊

(津國屋

伊三郎)

つのい

(つくにや

いさぶろう)

Tokyo

 

 

 

Kunichika & Yoshitoshi

Andreas Marks gives the

years ca. 1857-1869.

The carver Hori Chō worked on blocks for Kunichika for this publisher in 1868.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsuru-ya Kiemon

(seal name - Tsuruki 鶴喜;

firm name - Senkakudō 僊鶴堂;

family name -

Kobayashi Kiemon 小林喜右衛門)

Marks #553

鶴屋

喜右衛門

つるや

きえもん

Edo

 

The print shown to the right is not one we have offered. However, it has a publisher's seal which we want to display for your information. The image  has been sent to us from the Eikei (英渓) Collection. We are grateful for this contribution to our site

 

Marks seal #22-006

Chōki, Eizan,

Hiroshige, Hokusai,

Kiyoharu, Kiyomasa,

Kiyomasa II, Kiyomasu II,

Kiyomine,

Kiyomitsu II,

Kiyonaga, Kiyonobu II,

Kunisada, Kunimasa,

 Kuniyasu, Kuniyoshi, 

possibly Kyōsai,

Masanobu, Masayoshi,

Sadafusa,

Sadahide,

 Sadakage,  Shunchō,

Shun'ei, Shunsen,

Shunshō, Shunsui, Sudatora,

Toyokuni I, Toyonobu,

Utamaro, Utamaro II

& possibly Yoshiiku

As early as the 1620s or earlier to as late as 1852.

Again in ca. 1870 to 1898.

Andreas Marks in his Japanese Woodblock Prints: Artists, Publishers and Masterworks 1680-1900 (p. 190) tells us that this firm was one of the longeset lasting. They started out printing books. "In the 1670s, he published the first picture albums by Moronobu." In 1807 Tsuruya published the first prints by Kunisada. That was the same year the firm was part of the Picture Book and Print Publishers Guild and the Book Publishers Guild. "In 1811 and 1813, Tsuruya functioned as gyōji (censor) for the guild, following regulations by the government that attempted to control the market better." The most successful book they ever printed was the so-called 'Country Genji' authored by Ryūtei Tanehiko and illustrated by Kunisada. However, its success also got them into trouble with the authorities. Tsuruya "...was not able to recover from the complications with the 'Country Genji' and his business was taken over by fellow publisher Tsujiokaya Bunsuke in the fourth month of 1852. From this point on there are no more prints by Tsuruya, but books appear again starting around 1870 by Tsuruya Kiemon. In which way this Tsuruya is related to the previous is unclear."

 

 

   

 

An anonymous contributor has sent us this book illustration by Hasegawa Settan which shows the front and interior of  the shop of Tsuru-ya Kiemon.

 

Click on the image ot see a page with a larger detail.

This is not the publisher's seal, but rather one of their logos.

 

 

 

 

The image to the right by Toyokuni I gives and alternate seal which we have not offered yet. This was contributed to this site by my friend Mike.

 

Click on the image to see

a page with a larger detail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsuru-ya Kinsuke

Marks #554

 

鶴屋

金助

 

つるや

きんすけ

The image to the right by Toyokuni I is from the Lyon Collection.

Click on it to learn more.

 

 

Marks seal #06-002

Eisen,

Eizan, Hokusai,

Kunihisa,

Kunimitsu, Kuninao,

Kunisada,

Shuntei, Toyohiro,

Toyokuni I, Toyokuni II,

Tsukimaro, Utamaro

 

Andreas Marks gives the

dates of ca. 1797 to 1824

 

We have a question: Mark gives the last date for this publisher as 1824. But Toyokuni I didn't die until 1825. Then how could this house have been the publisher of works by Toyokuni II?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsuta-ya Jūzaburō

(seal name - Tsutajū, 

firm name - Kōshodō;

and others we have found are Shokodō, & Kōshodō Shujin)

Marks #555

蔦屋

重三郎   

つたや

じゅうざぶろう

Edo

 

The print shown to the right is not one we have offered. However, it has a publisher's seal which we want to display for your information. An anonymous correspondent has been kind enough to let us display it.

 

It shows the interior of Tsutaya's shop as it appeared in 1799 in the Ehon azuma asobi or 'Picture Book of the Pleasure Sports of the Eastern Capital' illustrated by Hokusai.

 

(This is from information

provided by Andreas Marks.)

Chōki, Eisen, Eizan,

Eishi, Fusanobu,

Harumachi, Hiroshige,

Hokuba,

as both Sori & Hokusai,

Kiyomasa, Kiyomitsu,

Kiyonaga, Koryūsai,

Kunimaru,

as both Kunisada &

 Toyokuni III, Kunimasa, 

Kuniyasu, Kuniyoshi,

Masanobu, Masayoshi,

Sharaku, Shigemasa,

Shunchō, Shun'ei,

Shunman, Shunshō

Toyokuni I, Toyokuni II,

 Tsukimaro & Utamaro

Started publishing in 1774

and continued to as late as

1847-52 or later

(This last date is from a seal

found on a Toyokuni III

triptych in the Boston MFA.)

 

"Tsuta-ya Jūzaburō is notable for having established a commanding and innovative presence in the Edo publishing world. He... is credited with 'the gift of discovering genius', particularly that of Utamaro. At various times he offered lodgings to Kyokutei Bakin, Santō Kyōden and Utamaro.... Tsuta-ya Jūzaburō... was born in the Yoshiwara pleasure quarter in 1750. [He died in 1797.] In 1773 opened a bookshop at the entrance to the quarter selling the guidebooks, or Yoshiwara saiken, published by the firm of Urokogataya Magobee, which had been in business since 1660. The following year he launched his career as a publisher with a courtesan critique, and in 1775 he produced his own guide to the Yoshiwara. In doing so he was probably taking advantage of the fact that Urokogataya Magobee was at the time beset by problems connected with a copyright infringement case..." For years Tsutajū competed head to head with Urokogataya for the Yoshiwara saiken market. Urokogataya lingered on until 1803 when they ceased publishing. "Well before this, however, he had begun to branch out, employing artists such as Katsukawa Shunshō to illustrate his guidebooks, and from 1776, publishing illustrated books on haikai poetry, ehon and sharebon." In 1783 he moved away from the Yoshiwara to a larger and permanent home.

 

In the 1780s he published poetry and light fiction, but in 1791 the new conservative government came down hard on him. "In that year, he published three of Santō Kyōden's sharebon. These were subsequently made an example of by the new régime in power... with the result that not only was Kyōden punished but also Tsutajū, who had gone through the correct procedures to gain permission to publish, had half his wealth confiscated, and the gyōji, or guild officials, were banished from Edo." After this Tsutajū left the guild he was working with and "...joined the guild of 'serious books'." Supposedly he did this more for financial reasons - he could now raise new capital to replace some of what he had been fined - than to clean up his act. "...the main focus of his activity in the early 1790s was actually not 'serious' publishing, but single sheet ukiyoe prints of beauties and actors by Utamaro, Sharaku and others." In 1794 he bought up the blocks for some illustrated books published by others, moved their seals and put his own on them. In 1796 he came out with his own new original publication in this field. "Although the firm survived for some years under the chief clerk, it lacked the entrepreneurial energy that had propelled it from obscurity..."

 

Source and quotes from: The Book in Japan: A Cultural History from the Beginnings to the Nineteenth Century by Peter Kornicki.

 

Andreas Marks in his Japanese Woodblock Prints: Artists, Publishers and Masterworks 1680-1900 (p. 204) says: Tsutaya Jūzaburō is probably the best known publisher today, mainly because of his forerunner position and connection to Utamaro and Sharaku." The first artist he published was Shigemasa in 1774. "In 1775, or perhaps already in 1774, Tsutaya joined the publisher Urokogataya in regularly issuing the 'Guide to the Yoshiwara' (Yoshiwara saiken). In fall of 1776, Tsutaya took over and continued these guides on a regular basis until 1836." In 1783 he took over the business of Maru-ya Kohei. This was also the first year he published works by Utamaro. After Jūzaburō I died in 1797 his chief clerk Yūsuke took over and continued the business operations the way they had been. He also adopted the name Jūzaburō II. Marks adds that "After the 1810s, only a very few publications appeared." In 1807 Tsutaya was listed as a member of the Picture Book and Print Publishers Guild and the Book Publishers Guild. The head of the firm acted as a print censor in 1811, 1812 and again in 1813. "In 1833 Jūzaburō II passed away and shortly thereafter, in 1837, Jūzaburō III died. The business was continued by Jūzaburō IV..." In 1852 it was taken over by Yamada Shōjirō. [That firm is listed further down this page.]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tsuta-ya Kichizō

(seal name -

Tsutakichi 蔦吉;

firm name -

Kōeidō 紅栄堂;

family name - Hayashi Kichizō 林吉蔵)

Marks #556

蔦屋
吉蔵

つたや
きちぞう

Edo

 

Marks seal #03-004

Marks notes that this seal

was used between  the

1820s-1861.

 

Chikanobu, Eisai,

Eisen, Ginkō,

Hiroshige, Hiroshige II,

Hiroshige III, Ikkei,

Kunichika,

Kunisada II,

Kunisada III,

Kunikiyo,

Kuniteru, Kuniyasu,

Kuniyoshi, Rinsai,

Sadatora,

Senchō, Sūgakudō,

Toshinobu, Toyokuni III,

Yoshiharu II, Yoshitora,

Yoshitoshi, Yoshitsuna,

Yoshitsuru I, Yoshitsuya

Andreas Marks gives the

dates of ca. 1820 to 1890

The carver Hori Gin worked
for this publisher. As did Hori Shōji.

 

 

 

  

 

 

Edo

 

The print to the right is

from the Lyon Collection.

Click on it to go to its

full page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Uemura Yohei

 (seal names -

Uemura 上村

and Ueyo 上与)

Marks #564

上村

与兵衛

うえむら

よへえ

Edo

 

The print is shown courtesy

of my friend Mike.

I am truly grateful.

 

Click on the image to see

a page with a larger detail.

 

 Marks seal #25-297

Marks notes that this seal

was used in 1796

and 1810.

 

Eisen, Kiyonobu II,

Kunimaru, Kunimasa,

Kunisada, Kunitora, Kuniyasu,

Kuniyoshi, Shun'ei,

Toyokuni I & Utamaro

 

Andreas Marks gives the

dates of ca. 1750s to 1832

 

 

 

  

 

 

Edo

 

The print to the right is

from the Lyon Collection.

Click on it to go to its

full page.

 

 

Marks seal #05-007

Marks notes that this seal

was used between  the

1813-1832.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Uo-ya Eikichi

2 variants shown

Marks #442

(Marks says this

is an erroneous misattribution

based on an incorrect reading

of this name. It should

be Sakanaya Eikichi.

See that entry on our

N thru S publishers page.)

魚屋
栄吉

うおや
えいきち

Edo

There is no link to the

Toyokuni III print shown above.

Hiroshige, Hiroshige II,

Kunisada II, Toyokuni III

& Yoshimori

As early as 1855 or earlier to

as late as 1866 according to

Andreas Marks.

 

 

 

 

There is no longer a link

to the print shown above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       
   

CLICK ON THE

BACK OF THE BAREN SHOWN ABOVE TO GO TO FIRST PUBLISHERS PAGE WHERE THEY ARE ARRANGED ACCORDING TO SHAPES!

   

 

 

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